About Us

The Arizona Foundation for Victims of Police Abuse was founded in 2017. Board members have not been announced yet. 

Our Goals

The objective of our organization is multi-pronged:

   

  • We want to spread awareness about the incidences of police abuse in Arizona. These unnecessary and preventable encounters, ranging from suppression of free speech to excessive force or unlawful shooting, often affect the poorest and most vulnerable members of society who lack the monetary or social influence necessary to have their story heard. They deserve a voice as much as anyone else who has been a victim of a crime and we are  committed to providing that voice. 
  • We want to educate American citizens about their natural born rights. A recent poll found that a full 1/3 of American adults could not name a single right guaranteed by the First Amendment. Another study found 1 in 5 Americans didn't know they had the right to remain silent while being questioned by police officers.    
  • We want to provide legal and financial aid to everyday Arizonans who, through no fault of their own, were subject to unjustified or excessive police violence as well as those as those languishing in jail because they cannot afford bail. Donations will fund a community “bail fund” that will be available to clients who qualify for bail relief to call the Foundation from jail.
  • To reduce recidivism rates and re-offenders in Arizona prisons. Research from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation shows that low-risk defendants are increasingly likely to be arrested again the longer they’re in jail. When compared with defendants who are in jail for one day or less, those in jail for 2-3 days are 39 percent more likely to be arrested again, those in jail for 4-7 days are 50 percent more likely, and those in jail for 8-14 days are 56 percent more likely. This study shows just how much public good it would do if the Foundation can get low-risk offenders bail relief in the timely fashion that they need.

FAQ's

Q: Are you a tax-deductible non-profit organization?


A: Yes! We are incorporated in Arizona as a non-profit and have 501(c)(3) status. 


Q: Are you an anti-police organization?


A: No. If police abuse of power and use of excessive force in Arizona was not a problem this organization would have no reason to exist. We would welcome working with the police community to lower the number of reported abuse cases every year.


Q: If you're committing a crime don't you deserve to be beaten/harassed/intimidated by law enforcement? 


A: No! Everyone in the United States has a right to a presumption of innocence until proven guilty. The police are not the judge nor the jury, they are simply the enforcers of the law. If you are accused of a crime, you have the right to be arrested without being subjected to unnecessary or excessive violence. We have a justice system complete with victim rights in place for a reason. 


Q: Do you advocate resisting arrest or harassing police officers?


A: Absolutely not. It is our position that if you are being arrested, you should comply with all lawful orders and remain silent until you have a lawyer present with you in the room. Resisting arrest or otherwise making a police officer's job harder is something we strongly condemn. However, we also strongly condemn police officers who charge otherwise innocent people with resisting arrest or disorderly conduct as their only crime just because the person said something an officer didn't like or didn't react as quickly as the officer would have wanted.

Statistics and Studies on Bail

Research from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation shows low-risk defendants are increasingly likely to be arrested again the longer they’re in jail. When compared with defendants who are in jail for one day or less, those in jail for 2-3 days are 39 percent more likely to be arrested again, those in jail for 4-7 days are 50 percent more likely, and those in jail for 8-14 days are 56 percent more likely. This study shows just how much public good it would do if AZVPA can get low-risk offenders the bail relief they need. 

A 2013 study from the Pretrial Justice Institute found that people paying for release were no more likely to show up than people who promised to pay the money on the back end if they failed to appear. 

A panel named 'Justice For All' commissioned in 2016 found that every year in Arizona, thousands of people are arrested and sit in jail awaiting trial simply because they cannot afford to post bail. While people arrested are protected by a presumption of innocence, if they lack the access to money, they often remain in jail. The Arizona Constitution makes it clear that except in limited situations, a person must be bailable. That is, defendants are generally entitled to be released (bailable) from jail on their own recognizance or other conditions, while awaiting the disposition of their offenses. 


It was also the panel's opinion that defendants should not have to remain in custody simply because they are poor. Research has now shown that imposing money bail does not improve the chances that a defendant will return to court, nor does it protect the public because many high-risk defendants have access to money and can post bond. Instead, they found, it serves only to treat differently those who can and cannot get money. 

Contact Us

Email Arizona Foundation for Victims of Police Abuse

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925 W Baseline Rd Ste 105-A9, Tempe, AZ 85283-0901